Sunday, November 19, 2017

Weaving Excuses














On a day when I should have been at home doing things, I wasn't. We have passels of beloveds coming to town for the Thanksgiving holiday and I should have spent the day baking and vacuuming. But I didn't.

Instead,  I tiptoed out of church early and drove north on Route 9N. I meandered through Greenfield Center, up to Corinth and into the Adirondack Park, and then followed the Hudson River into the village of Lake Luzerne.

It was a bit of a sentimental journey for me. Many years ago, maybe thirty-eight or so, my very first job as a teacher was in Luzerne, teaching in the Hadley-Luzerne elementary school, in a classroom that overlooked the lake. I worked there for six years, before taking some time off to be at home with my own children. And when I returned to work, I moved to a different school district, so it had been some time since I'd been back to Luzerne. I have to say, it was looking lovely today, despite the blustery November weather.

But this day, I was headed to another school there, the Adirondack Folk School.  Our Malta Rotary Club had recently had as a guest speaker Scott Hayden, the director of the Folk School. Scott had brought samples of some of the crafts they teach there and I was intrigued. So, I signed up for a one-afternoon class on weaving. We would weave simple rugs from rags.

The class size was limited to four. Floor looms take up a lot of space and beginners need a lot of help. My fellow students and I fell into a certain demographic: we were all grey-haired ladies of a certain age. Carolyn, our instructor, will probably sleep well tonight. We kept her hopping.

Looms are tricky things and one of ours was not behaving. Fortunately, my loom had only a few idiosyncrasies, and four hours later, with a good deal of help and advice,  I had made a rug.  In fact, we all managed to produce rugs.

It was really a lot of fun. The studio overlooked the beginning of Rockwell Falls on the Hudson, and although it was a blustery day, we were cozy and companionable in our classroom. Other classes were going on at the Folk School that afternoon, too. I saw a basket-making class and heard some tap tap tapping going on in the basement. Not sure what they were making, but it all sounded like Santa's workshop.

I still had a few finishing details to do on my rug when I got home this evening: tying off the fringed edges and tidying up loose ends. But when I laid it out to appraise the final product, Shea, our small dog, gave the rug her full approval. No, it won't win any prizes, but I had fun.

So to my dear family arriving soon to a far less than perfectly tidy house, um, well... can I show you the cool rug I just made?
~~~

The Adirondack Folk School is located at  51 Main Street in Lake Luzerne, NY.  Find out more about their classes and programs at their website here: http://www.adirondackfolkschool.org/







.








2 comments:

  1. What a beautiful rug! A great blog, too! So glad you tried this and shared the experience!

    Nurturing your creative side is important.

    See you soon!

    Love,

    Mary

    ReplyDelete
  2. Good for you, kindred spirit! Repeatedly, I come close to gifting myself a rigid heddle loom. Hmmm... people will soon be asking me what merry gift I would like. I am a difficult gift recipient, having all the material goods I need. But... based on your expetience, should I get a small loom? I just know the answer will be, "Yes!" Lap or with a floor stand? Gretchen

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for visiting!